Helpful Estonian construction workers rescue wolf from frozen river thinking it’s a dog!

The wolf, believed to be only around one-year-old, was treated for severe hypothermia and shock and given parasite control drugs. (Source: EUPA/ Facebook) A group of helpful construction workers spotted what they thought was a dog in frozen waters and decided to rescue it, only to find out later it was a wolf! Yes, three men in Estonia recently rushed to rescue a ‘dog’ that had fallen through the ice on the Pärnu River.

When they took the rescued animal to the vet, staff expressed suspicions about the true nature of animal. It was a local hunter who could confirm that their new friend was a wolf.

The men were working at the Sindi dam on the river when they spotted the animal trapped in frozen water. “They managed to push ice chunks away and clear a path for the animal, who had enough strength to swim about 100 metres to the shore,” the Estonian World reported. The men said the animal was calm after they helped it and did not raise any alarm.

“He was calm, slept on my legs. When I wanted to stretch them, he raised his head for a moment,” one of the men, Rando Kartsepp, told the Estonian newspaper Postimees.

According to the Estonian Animal Protection Association (EUPA), they received a phone call from a young gentleman called Robin Sillamäe, who said he and his colleagues had “rescued a dog” from the Pärnu River. The men tried to keep the animal warm by wrapping it in a towel and inside their car. They found a clinic nearby and directed the men to take the animal there for primary care. The EUPA said the young wolf had low blood pressure when it arrived at the veterinarian’s office, which may have explained its docile nature after the men carried it to their car to warm it up.

“At first, he was so done in for he didn’t resist at all. We simply kept him in this room. But once he started to get an idea of the situation, I felt things might quickly take a turn for the dangerous. We got him into a cage,” head of the clinic Tarvo Markson told Postimees. The wolf, believed to be only around one-year-old, was treated for severe hypothermia and shock and given parasite control drugs. And according to the Terveks Clinic, the animal was released into the wild on Thursday with a GPS tracker.

Dubbing it as an unique kind of experience, the men and the vets were happy the animal was safe and it all ended well.

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